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Home | Events Archive | Do Family Policies Reduce Gender Inequality? Evidence from 60 Years of Policy Experimentation
Seminar

Do Family Policies Reduce Gender Inequality? Evidence from 60 Years of Policy Experimentation


  • Series
  • Speaker(s)
    Andreas Steinhauer (University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom)
  • Field
    Empirical Microeconomics
  • Location
    Online
  • Date and time

    December 15, 2020
    15:30 - 16:30

Please send an email to Nadine Ketel or Paul Muller if you are interested to participate in this seminar (series).

Abstract

Do family policies reduce gender inequality in the labor market? We contribute to this debate by investigating the joint impact of parental leave and child care, using administrative data covering the labor market and birth histories of Austrian workers over more than half a century. We start by quasi-experimentally identifying the causal effects of all family policy reforms since the 1950s on the full dynamics of male and female earnings. We then map these causal estimates into a decomposition framework a la Kleven, Landais and Søgaard (2019) to compute counterfactual gender gaps. Our results show that the enormous expansions of parental leave and child care subsidies have had virtually no impact on gender convergence. Joint work with Henrik Kleven, Camille Landais, Johanna Posch, & Josef Zweimüller.

Read full paper here: https://www.nber.org/papers/w28082