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Home | Events Archive | Jobs and Political Participation - Evidence from a Field Experiment in Ethiopia
Seminar

Jobs and Political Participation - Evidence from a Field Experiment in Ethiopia


  • Series
  • Speaker
    Janneke Pieters (Wageningen University)
  • Field
    Empirical Microeconomics
  • Location
    Tinbergen Institute Amsterdam, room 1.60
    Amsterdam
  • Date and time

    September 28, 2021
    16:00 - 17:00

Please send an email to Nadine Ketel or Paul Muller if you are interested to participate in this seminar (series) and are not yet on the mailing list. For this particular seminar, seats are limited.

We identify the effects of employment on political participation by collaborating
with 27 large companies in Ethiopia to randomly assign jobs to equally qualified
female applicants. The job offers increase formal employment and earnings but
we can clearly reject any positive effects on political participation. We find no
effects on political interest, raising issues, or protest activity and we find negative
effects on participation in community meetings. We further find that job offers
reduce internal and external political efficacy, suggesting that employment may
actually be politically disempowering. Our qualitative data suggest that several
features of the jobs may contribute to lower political efficacy directlyWe identify the effects of employment on political participation by collaborating with 27 large companies in Ethiopia to randomly assign jobs to equally qualified female applicants. The job offers increase formal employment and earnings but we can clearly reject any positive effects on political participation. We find no effects on political interest, raising issues, or protest activity and we find negative effects on participation in community meetings. We further find that job offers reduce internal and external political efficacy, suggesting that employment may actually be politically disempowering. Our qualitative data suggest that several features of the jobs may contribute to lower political efficacy directly. Joint paper with Lovise Aalen, Andreas Kotsadam, Janneke Pieters, Espen Villanger.

Read full paper here.