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Home | Events | Tinbergen Institute Lectures | TI Economics Lectures 2025

TI Economics Lectures 2025

The Tinbergen Institute Lectures are an annual series of advanced PhD level courses. Qualified internal and external research master and PhD students are explicitly invited to participate. 

Peter Hull, Professor of Economics at Brown University, United States will give the TI Economics Lectures 2025. Date: May 26-28, 2025 


The topic of the 2025 TI Economics Lectures will be on "design-based" causal identification with regression and IV.


Peter Hull received his PhD in Economics from MIT in 2017 and came to Brown in 2021 after working as an Assistant Professor at the University of Chicago, a Research Fellow at the Becker Friedman Institute, and a Postdoctoral Researcher at Microsoft Research New England. He is a labor economist with research interests in applied econometrics, education, healthcare, and discrimination. He is a Faculty Research Fellow in the National Bureau of Economics programs in Labor Studies and Health Care, an Affiliated Faculty Member at MIT Blueprint Labs, and a Research Network Affiliate of CESifo. He is also editor at the Review of Economics and Statistics.

Professor Hull works on developing new econometric methods for measuring quality across different institutions (such as schools, hospitals, and insurance plans) as well as inequality in high-stakes decision-making (such as pretrial release or lending decisions). Much of this work leverages quasi-experimental assignment in an instrumental variables framework. Professor hull has also developed new frameworks for leveraging such quasi-random shocks in settings with complex non-random shock exposure.