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Home | News | Paper by VU PhD candidate Roger Prudon and TI Research Fellows Pierre Koning and Paul Muller accepted for publication in the Journal of Health Economics
News | February 23, 2022

Paper by VU PhD candidate Roger Prudon and TI Research Fellows Pierre Koning and Paul Muller accepted for publication in the Journal of Health Economics

VU PhD candidate and TI Research Master graduate Roger Prudon and TI Research Fellows Pierre Koning and Paul Muller jointly wrote a paper entitled Do Disability Benefits Hinder Work Resumption after Recovery? which has been accepted for publication in the Journal of Health Economics.

Paper by VU PhD candidate Roger Prudon and TI Research Fellows Pierre Koning and Paul Muller accepted for publication in the Journal of Health Economics

 Paper abstract: While a large share of Disability Insurance recipients are expected to recover, outflow rates from temporary disability schemes are typically negligible. We estimate the disincentive effects of disability benefits on the response to a (mental) health improvement using administrative data on all Dutch disability benefit applicants. We compare those below the DI eligibility threshold with those above and find that disincentives significantly reduce work resumption after health improves. Approximately half of the response to recovery is offset by benefits. Structural labor supply model estimates suggest disincentive effects are substantially larger when the workers earnings capacity is fully restored.

Interested? Read the full paper here.

Top: Paul Muller
Left: Pierre Koning
Right: Roger Prudon