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Home | People | Stephanie von Hinke
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Stephanie von Hinke

Research Fellow

University
Erasmus University Rotterdam
Research field
Empirical Microeconomics
Interests
Applied-microeconomics, Education, Health, Inequality, Policy Evaluation

Biography

Stephanie’s research builds on the biomedical as well as social sciences. She investigates the importance of genetics, early life environments, parental investments, and government policy in explaining individuals’ health and well-being over the life course. She currently holds an ERC Starting Grant that aims to incorporate genetic data into social science research and study the importance of the nature-nurture interplay in the developmental origins of health and disease.

List of publications

Avdic, D. and von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.(. (2021). Extending alcohol retailers{\textquoteright} opening hours: Evidence from Sweden European Economic Review, 138:.

Fichera, E. and von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L. (2020). The Response to Nutritional Labels: Evidence from a Quasi-Experiment. Journal of Health Economics, 72:.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L., Leckie, G. and Nicoletti, C (2019). The use of instrumental variables in peer effects models Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, :.

Griffith, R., von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L. and Smith, S. (2018). Getting a Healthy Start? The effectiveness of targeted benefits for improving dietary choices. Journal of Health Economics, 58:176--187.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L. and Leckie, G. (2017). Protecting energy intakes against income shocks Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 141:210--232.

Cawley, J., Dragone, D. and von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L. (2016). The Demand for Cigarettes as Derived from the Demand for Weight Control: A theoretical and empirical investigation Health Economics, 25(1):8--23.

Dixon, P., Davey Smith, G., von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L., Davies, N. and Hollingworth, W. (2016). Estimating marginal medical care expenditures using genetic variants as instrumental variables: Mendelian Randomization in economic evaluation Pharmacoeconomics (Print), 34:1075--1086.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L., Davey Smith, G., Lawlor, DA, Propper, C. and Windmeijer, F. (2016). Genetic Markers as Instrumental Variables Journal of Health Economics, 45:131--148.

Ratcliffe, A. and von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L. (2015). The London Bombings and Racial Prejudice: Evidence from Housing and Labour Markets Economic Inquiry, 53(1):276--293.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L., Wehby, G., Lewis, S. and Zuccolo, L (2014). Alcohol Exposure In Utero and Child Academic Achievement Economic Journal, 124(576):634--667.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L., Davey Smith, G., Lawlor, DA, Propper, C. and Windmeijer, F. (2013). Child Height, Health and Human Capital: Evidence using Genetic Markers European Economic Review, 57:1--22.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L. (2013). School Meal Crowd Out in the 1980s Journal of Health Economics, 32:538--545.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L., Davey Smith, G., Lawlor, D, Propper, C. and Windmeijer, F. (2011). Mendelian Randomization: The use of Genes in Instrumental Variable Analyses Health Economics, 20(8):893--896.

Burgess, S, Propper, C., Ratto, M., von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L. and Tominey, E. (2010). Smarter Task Assignment or Greater Effort: The Impact of Incentives on Team Performance? Economic Journal, 120(547):968--989.

von Hinke Kessler Scholder, S.M.L. (2008). Maternal Employment and Overweight Children: Does Timing Matter? Health Economics, 17(8):889--906.